May 4, 2015 ATM

FY16 Annual Town Meeting

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The Town Meeting Report with articles, motions, recommendations, and explanations is available below, and was mailed to all residential dwellings 14 days prior to town meeting.

FY16 - Annual Town Meeting                                                                                                                                               

Date/Time:Monday, May 4, 2015 at 7:00 pm
Location:Charles Forbes Kaye Gymnasium, Littleton Middle School, 55 Russell Street, Littleton, MA 01460
Warrant:

Annual Town Meeting - posted March 24, 2015

Reports:Town Meeting Report - Articles, Motions & Recommendations

Town Meeting Results:

  1. Town Officers
  2. Annual Report

    Financial Articles
  3. FY 2016 Revolving Funds
  4. FY 2016 Operating Budget
  5. FY 2016 Water Enterprise Fund Operating Budget
  6. FY 2016 Park/Recreation Enterprise Fund Operating Budget
  7. FY 2016 Capital Items from Available Funds
  8. FY 2016 Community Preservation Budget
  9. Fund Collective Bargaining Agreements
  10. Personnel By-law Amendments
  11. Stabilization Fund [2/3rds vote]
  12. Capital Stabilization Fund [2/3rds vote]
  13. School Trust Fund Grants
  14. Senior Work Program
  15. Use of Chapter 90 MassDOT Funds
  16. Rescind unused borrowing authority [2/3rds vote]

    Articles requiring supermajority vote
  17. Zoning By-law Amendment: Nonconforming Structures [2/3rds vote]

    Other articles, including routine authorizations and reauthorizations
  18. Town By-law Amendment: Stretch Energy Code (Green Communities Act criterion)
  19. Complete Streets Program
  20. Borrowing Authorization
  21. Compensating Balance Agreement
  22. FY 2016 Personal Exemption Amounts

Town Meeting Results

ARTICLE 1 - Board of Selectmen - Town Officers

To choose all Town Officers and Committees necessary to be chosen at the Annual Town Meeting.

Motion: Moved and seconded by the Board of Selectmen that the following Officers be chosen for the year 2015: Fence Viewers: Timothy Harrison Whitcomb, Joseph Knox; Field Driver: Raymond C. O'Neil; Surveyor of Timber & Measurer of Wood Bark: Henry Parlee; Measurers and Weighers of Grain, Hay, Coal and Livestock: to be determined.

Board of Selectmen supports Article 1.

[Consent Calendar Article: approved by unanimous vote]

ARTICLE 2 - Board of Selectmen - Annual Report

To hear and act upon the reports of the Town Officers and Committees.

Motion: Moved and seconded by the Board of Selectmen that the Town vote to accept all printed reports of Town Officers and Committees as published in the 2014 Annual Town Report.

Board of Selectmen supports Article 2.

Article passes.

[FINANCIAL ARTICLES]

Article 3 - Board of Selectmen - FY2016 Revolving Funds

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the following Fiscal Year 2016 Revolving Funds, in accordance with Chapter 44, section 53E½ of the General Laws, each with the prior year’s fund balance to be available for expenditure; or to take any other action in relation thereto.
  1. Wiring/Plumbing/Gas Inspections: to allow receipts from wiring and plumbing fees to be segregated into a special account; and with funds therefrom, up to a limit of $100,000 annually, to be expended to compensate the Wiring, Plumbing and Gas Inspectors, under the direction of the Building Commissioner;
  2. Dog By-law Enforcement: to allow receipts from dog license fees and fines to be segregated into a special account; and with funds therefrom, up to a limit of $12,000 annually, to be expended for costs associated with by-law enforcement, under the direction of the Chief of Police;
  3. Alarm Box Repairs: to allow receipts from alarm box fees to be segregated into a special account; and with funds therefrom, up to a limit of $5,000 annually, to be expended for repairs to alarm boxes, under the direction of the Fire Department;
  4. CPR Courses: to allow receipts from CPR course fees to be segregated into a special account; and with funds therefrom, up to a limit of $2,000 annually, to be expended for CPR course costs, under the direction of the Fire Department;
  5. Sealer of Weights and Measures: to allow receipts from sealer fees to be segregated into a special account; and with funds therefrom, up to a limit of $3,000 annually, to be expended to compensate the Sealer, under the direction of the Board of Selectmen;
  6. Fire Safety Act Compliance: to allow receipts from Fire Safety Act fees and fines to be segregated into a special account; and with funds therefrom, up to a limit of $3,000 annually, to be expended for associated administrative costs, under the direction of the Board of Selectmen;
  7. MART bus fees: to allow receipts from reimbursement from the Montachusett Regional Transit Authority (MART) bus fees to be segregated into a special account; and with funds therefrom, up to a limit of $68,000 annually, to be expended for wages and expenses for senior van operation, under the direction of the Director of Elder and Human Services;
  8. Pet Cemetery: to allow receipts from pet cemetery fees to be segregated into a special account; and with funds therefrom, up to a limit of $20,000 annually, to be expended for associated administrative costs, under the direction of the Cemetery Commission;
  9. Spectacle Pond Cell Tower: to allow receipts from the Spectacle Pond Cell Tower rent to be segregated into a special account; and with funds therefrom, up to a limit of $40,000 annually, to be expended for debt service for the Clean Lakes program, under the direction of the Board of Selectmen;
  10. Legal Advertisements: to allow receipts paid by applicants for advertising costs to be segregated into a special account; and with funds therefrom, up to a limit of $5,000 annually, to be expended for legal advertising costs, under the direction of the Board of Appeals;
  11. Cemetery Revolving: to allow a portion of receipts received from sales of lots to be segregated into a special account; and with funds therefrom, up to a limit of $10,000 annually, to be expended for expenses associated with maintenance of such under the direction of the Cemetery Commissioners;
  12. Permitting Software: to allow a portion of receipts received from land use permit fees to be segregated into a special account; and with funds therefrom, up to a limit of $15,000 annually, to be expended for expenses associated with maintenance of permitting software under the direction of the Board of Selectmen;
  13. Police Cruisers sale proceeds:  to allow the proceeds resulting from the sale/disposal of retired police vehicles to be segregated into a special account; and with funds therefrom, up to a limit of $25,000 annually, to be expended for expenses associated with purchasing Police replacement vehicles authorized under the Capital Plan under the direction of the Board of Selectmen; and
  14. Composting Bins: to allow the proceeds resulting from the disposal/sale of composting bins to be segregated into a special account; and with funds therefrom, up to a limit of $5,000 annually, to be expended for expenses associated with the expenses of said program under the direction of the Highway Operations Manager.

Motion: Moved and seconded by the Board of Selectmen that the Town vote, in accordance with Chapter 44, section 53E½ of the General Laws, to authorize Fiscal Year 2016 Revolving Funds precisely as set forth in Article 3 as printed in the warrant.

Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen support Article 3.

ARTICLE 4 - Finance Committee/Board of Selectmen - FY 2016 Operating Budget

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds in the treasury or transfer from the Enterprise and Trust Funds, such sums of money to defray the expenses of the various departments of the Town and to fix the salary and compensation of all elected officials for the Fiscal Year beginning July 1, 2015, or to take any other action in relation thereto.

[Article 4 is the FY 2016 recommended budget and financing plan reached by the Finance Committee, Board of Selectmen, and School Committee. As shown in the table on page 43 below, the total spending plan for FY 2016 is in balance at $43,219,729.

[On the Town side, the recommended operating budget represents an increase of $163,165 or 2.21% over FY 2015, to fund Town departments at level staffing.

[The School’s appropriation increases by $550,000, or 3.29%. The School Committee plans to augment the $17.25-million appropriated in this article with $700,000 from so-called “circuit breaker” and $373,797 in “school choice” reserve funds to meet its spending plan.

[Employee/retiree benefit costs for Town and Schools increases by $441,253 or 6.90%, due primarily to increases in group health insurance rates and retirement assessments.]

Motion: Moved and seconded by the Finance Committee that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $36,576,868 and transfer from the funds specified herein the sum of $1,023,242, for a total of $37,600,110 to defray the expenses of the various departments of the Town as specified herein and to fix the salary and compensation of all elected officials for the Fiscal Year beginning July 1, 2015.

   

FY2014

FY2015

FY2016

 

Department

 

Actual

Budget

Budget

114

MODERATOR

    
 

Expenses

 

0

100

100

  

Total 114

0

100

100

122

SELECTMEN / TOWN ADMINISTRATOR

   
 

Personal Services

 

166,738

172,420

178,975

 

Expenses

 

11,866

11,870

11,870

 

MAGIC/MAPC Assessments

 

11,600

11,625

11,625

  

Total 122

190,204

195,915

202,470

131

FINANCE COMMITTEE

    
 

Personal Services

 

368

700

700

 

Expenses

 

235

500

500

  

Total 131

603

1,200

1,200

132

RESERVE FUND

    
 

Expenses

 

118,721

150,000

150,000

  

Total 132

118,721

150,000

150,000

135

FINANCE AND BUDGET

    
 

Personal Services

 

554,349

580,115

595,224

 

Expenses

 

33,989

36,655

39,020

 

Audit

 

33,690

40,000

40,000

  

Total 135

622,028

656,770

674,244

151

LEGAL

    
 

Expenses

 

263,164

175,000

250,000

  

Total 151

263,164

175,000

250,000

155

INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    
 

Personal Services

 

87,028

90,080

90,422

 

Expenses

 

174,402

198,402

198,402

  

Total 155

261,430

288,482

288,824

161

TOWN CLERK

    
 

Elected Salaries

 

54,335

56,236

59,605

 

Personal Services

 

17,088

18,220

18,906

 

Expenses

 

1,498

1,500

1,500

 

Transfer In - Dog Tax Fund

 

(2,200)

(2,200)

(2,200)

  

Total 161

70,721

73,756

77,811

162

ELECTIONS & REGISTRATIONS

    
 

Expenses

 

12,000

8,700

8,700

  

Total 162

12,000

8,700

8,700

171

CONSERVATION COMMISSION

    
 

Personal Services

 

23,490

24,315

35,045

 

Expenses

 

1.000

1,000

1,000

 

Transfer In - Wetland Fund

 

(5,280)

(5,280)

(15,500)

  

Total 171

19,210

20,035

20,545

175

PLANNING BOARD

    
 

Personal Services

 

60,287

62,360

64,777

 

Expenses

 

1,112

1,175

1,175

  

Total 175

61,399

63,535

65,952

176

APPEALS BOARD

    
 

Personal Services

 

4,237

4,385

4,557

 

Expenses

 

135

1,000

1,000

  

Total 176

4,372

5,385

5,557

191

BUILDING MAINTENANCE

    
 

Personal Services

 

51,987

57,160

57,160

 

Expenses

 

364,998

365,000

375,000

  

Total 191

416,985

422,160

432,160

193

GENERAL INSURANCE

    
 

Expenses

 

300,567

340,000

350,000

  

Total 193

300,567

340,000

350,000

194

EMPLOYEE/RETIREE BENEFITS

    
 

Expenses

 

4,892,444

5,726,579

6,098,232

 

Other Post Employment Benefits Liability Fund

689,835

813,998

665,500

 

Transfer In - Cable Studio Benefits

 

(21,692)

(22,885)

(24,029)

 

Transfer In - Recreation Revolving

 

0

0

0

  

Total 194

5,684,750

6,369,194

6,809,203

196

TOWN REPORT / TOWN MEETING

   
 

Expenses

 

4,899

5,000

5,000

  

Total 196

4,899

5,000

5,000

197

CABLE STUDIO

    
 

Personal Services

 

83,400

85,650

88,998

 

Expenses

 

20,250

20,250

20,250

 

Transfer In - Cable Access Fees

 

(103,650)

(105,900)

(109,248)

  

Total 197

0

0

0

      

210

POLICE / DISPATCH

    
 

Personal Services

 

1,540,931

1,628,463

1,630,765

 

Expenses

 

102,687

100,571

107,421

  

Total 210

1,643,618

1,729,034

1,738,186

220

FIRE / EMS DEPARTMENT

    
 

Personal Services

 

888,938

957,199

996,987

 

Expenses

 

108,845

114,588

114,588

 

Transfer In -Ambulance Fees

 

(287,000)

(287,000)

(300.000)

  

Total 220

710,783

784,787

811,575

241

BUILDING DEPARTMENT

    
 

Personal Services

 

98,768

106,760

185,691

 

Expenses

 

2,366

5,060

5,060

 

Transfer In - Inspectional Revolving

 

(3,000)

(3,000)

(77,772)

  

Total 241

98,134

108,820

112,979

300

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT

    
 

Budget

 

16,400,000

16,700,000

17,250,000

 

Transfer In - LH Zappy Trust

 

(200)

(200)

0

 

Transfer In - Hildreth Trust

 

(6,000

(6,000)

0

 

Transfer In - Goldsmith Trust

 

(500)

(500)

0

 

Transfer In - Johnson Trust

 

(750)

(750)

0

  

Total 300

16,392,550

16,692,550

17,250,000

301

TECHNICAL SCHOOL EXPENDITURES

   
 

Expenses – Nashoba Tech

 

689,712

534,493

474,448

 

Expenses – Minuteman Tech

 

36,618

40,000

20,000

  

Total 301

726,330

574,493

494,448

420

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT

    
 

Personal Services

 

645,166

763,033

765,089

 

Expenses

 

346,815

396,927

376,867

 

Streetlights

 

29,351

31,750

32,000

 

Park Maintenance

 

9,250

9,450

9,700

 

Wastewater

 

77.000

70,800

87,000

 

B&M Crossing

 

2,806

2,807

2,808

 

Gasoline

 

124,685

125,000

125,000

  

Total 420

1,235,073

1,399,767

1,398,464

422

ROADWAY REPAIRS

    
 

Expenses

 

483,674

688,509

695,394

  

Total 422

483,674

688,509

695,394

423

SNOW & ICE

    
 

Personal Services

 

98,334

68,000

68,000

 

Expenses

 

316,386

132,000

132,000

  

Total 423

414,720

200,000

200,000

491

CEMETERY DEPARTMENT

    
 

Personal Services

 

90,083

96,385

96,752

 

Expenses

 

17,800

17,800

17,800

 

Transfer In - Cemetery Trust

 

(13,000)

(13,000)

(13,000)

 

Transfer In - Sale of Cemetery Lots

 

(12,000)

(12,000)

(12,000)

 

Transfer In - Graves

 

(18,897)

(18,897)

(18,897)

  

Total 491

63,986

70,288

70,655

510

HEALTH DEPARTMENT

    
 

Personal Services

 

19,064

19,732

20,506

 

Expenses

 

1,390

3,235

2,587

 

Assessment - Nashoba BOH

 

22,250

22,250

22,250

 

Assessment - Nashoba Nursing

 

8,326

8,700

8,700

 

Assessment - Eliot Clinic

 

3,780

3,780

3,780

 

Assessment – SANS Program

 

0

5,000

12,000

 

Animal Inspector

 

2,400

2,400

2,400

 

Transfer In - B. Sampson Animal Fund

(2,500)

(2,500)

(2,500)

  

Total 510

54,710

62,597

69,723

541

ELDER AND HUMAN SERVICES

    
 

Personal Services

 

69,365

105,083

110,513

 

Expenses

 

12,340

13,416

13,921

  

Total 541

81,705

118,499

124,434

543

VETERANS SERVICES

    
 

Personal Services

 

5,000

5,000

5,000

 

Expenses

 

750

750

1,515

 

Veteran Benefits

 

73,316

70,000

120,000

  

Total 543

78,561

75,750

126,515

610

REUBEN HOAR LIBRARY

    
 

Personal Services

 

378,868

417,159

422,976

 

Expenses

 

71,022

75,539

81,193

 

Merrimack Valley Assessment

 

31,714

32,242

33,854

 

Transfer In - Library Trust Fund

 

(11,500)

(11,500)

(11,500)

  

Total 610

470,104

513,440

526,523

630

PARK AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT

   
 

Personal Services

 

168,095

0

0

 

Transfer In - Revolving Wages

 

(128,095)

0

0

 

Transfer out - Enterprise Fund

 

0

144,000

102,000

  

Total 630

40,000

144,000

102,000

690

OTHER CULTURE & RECREATION

   
 

Historical

 

4,200

700

700

 

Memorial Day

 

500

500

500

 

Patriot's Day

 

50

50

50

  

Total 690

4,750

1,250

1,250

      

710

LONG TERM DEBT

 

3,612,121

3,461,993

3,309,482

720

SHORT TERM DEBT

 

322,511

959,180

640,070

 

Transfer In - Self Help Grant

 

(17,000)

(17,000)

(17,000)

 

Transfer In - Wastewater Settlement

 

(17,274)

(17,274)

(17,274)

 

Transfer In - Oak Hill Cell Tower

 

(36,269)

(35,269)

(34,269)

 

Transfer In -  Newtown Hill Cell Tower

(43,373)

(42,248)

(41,048)

 

Transfer In - Bond Premium

 

(62,268)

(58,120)

(54,067)

 

Transfer In - Community Preservation

(62,038)

(61,038)

(127,315)

 

Transfer In - Light Department

 

(168,687)

(161,957)

(154,530)

 

Total Debt Service

4,669,258

3,529,848

3,963,190

      
 

FUNDING SUMMARY

    
 

Net Budgets

 

35,080,647

36,851,801

37,600,110

 

Transfers In

 

(1,021,048)

(949,595)

(1,023,242)

 

Total Appropriated Budgets

 

34,059,599

35,902,206

36,576,868

Finance Committee, Board of Selectmen, and School Committee support Article 4.

ARTICLE 5 - Board of Water Commissioners - FY 2016 Water Enterprise Fund Operating Budget

To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $3,103,000 or any other sum or sums of money from the Water Enterprise Fund to finance the operation of the Water Department for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2015 (detail below), or to take any other action in relation thereto.

I.  Water Enterprise Revenues

FY 2015

FY 2016

    User Charges

$2,545,000

$3,003,000

    Enterprise Available Funds

100,000

100,000

    Investment Income

0

0

Total Revenues

$2,645,000

$3,103,000

II. Costs Appropriated for the Enterprise Fund

 

 

    Salaries and Wages

$760,000

$800,000

    Expenses

954,500

1,200,000

    Capital Outlay – Equipment

0

65,000

    Capital Outlay – Improvements

0

387,524

    Reserve Fund

100,000

100,000

    Debt Principal and Interest

669,812

550,476

    Budgeted Surplus

160,688

0

Total Costs Appropriated for Enterprise Fund

$2,645,000

$3,103,000

III. Costs Appropriated for General Fund to be Charged to the Enterprise Fund

 

    Indirect Costs

$0

$0

    Benefits

0

0

    Pension Costs

0

0

Total Costs Appropriated for the General Fund.

0

0

Total Costs

$2,645,000

$3,103,000

[Article 5 funds the water enterprise fund for FY 2016. The Water Department’s budget request is an increase of $458,000, or 17.3%, from FY 2015, reflecting recent water rate increases adopted by the Board of Water Commissioners to be able to fund debt service on capital projects, including improvements to Beaver Brook Well #2 ($3.75-million). There is no General Fund subsidy for the Water Enterprise Fund, which is fully funded by water revenues.

Motion: Moved and seconded by the Board of Water Commissioners that the Town vote to appropriate $3,103,000 from the Water Enterprise Fund to finance the operation of the Water Department for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2015.

Finance Committee, Board of Water Commissioners, and Board of Selectmen support Article 5.

ARTICLE 6 - Park & Recreation Commission - FY 2016 Park, Recreation & Community Education Enterprise Fund Operating Budget

To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $877,894 or any other sum or sums of money from the Park, Recreation & Community Education Enterprise Fund to finance the operation of the Park, Recreation and Community Education Department for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2015 (detail below), or to take any other action in relation thereto.

I.  PRCE Enterprise Revenues

FY 2015

FY 2016

    User Charges

$745,000

$775,394

    Transfer In from Recreation Fund

297,776

0

    Transfer In from General Fund

144,000

102,000

    Enterprise Available Funds

0

0

    Investment Income

500

500

Total Revenues

$1,187,276

$877,894

II. Costs Appropriated for the Enterprise Fund

 

 

    Salaries and Wages

$465,000

$375,000

    Expenses

600,000

452,894

    Capital Outlay – Equipment

22,000

0

    Capital Outlay – Improvements

20,000

0

    Reserve Fund

50,000

50,000

    Debt Principal and Interest

0

0

    Budgeted Surplus

0

0

Total Costs Appropriated for Enterprise Fund

$1,157,000

$877,894

III. Costs Appropriated for General Fund to be Charged to the Enterprise Fund

 

 

    Indirect Costs

$30,276

$0

    Benefits

0

0

    Pension Costs

0

0

Total Costs Appropriated for the General Fund.

$30,276

$0

Total Costs

$1,187,276

$877,894

[Article 6 funds the FY 2016 enterprise fund for the Park, Recreation & Community Education Department. Prior to FY 2015, PRCE had been funded both by an annual operating budget and by a series of separate revolving funds. All fees generated by PRCE are now retained by its enterprise fund, with the balance certified annually by the state’s Department of Revenue. The general fund subsidy for PRCE is $102,000 for FY 2016.]

Motion: Moved and seconded by the Park and Recreation Commission that the Town vote to appropriate $877,894 from the Park, Recreation & Community Education Enterprise Fund to finance the operation of the Park, Recreation and Community Education Department for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2015.

Finance Committee, Park & Recreation Commission, and Board of Selectmen support Article 6.

ARTICLE 7 - Board of Selectmen/ Finance Committee - FY 2016 Capital Items from Available Funds

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, and/or transfer from available funds, a sum or sums of money, to be expended by the respective Departments or Officers indicated, for the capital projects and purchases itemized and described, or to take any other action in relation thereto.

I. POLICE DEPARTMENT

  1. Police Interceptor Patrol vehicles as replacements - $102,923 to be expended by the Police Department for police cruiser replacements.

    [This funds the purchase of two Ford Interceptor marked cruisers to replace a 2010 Dodge Charger and a Ford Crown Victoria both with over 100,000 miles. These cruisers are the front line response vehicles for the community.]
  2. Police Interceptor Unmarked vehicles as replacement - $43,208 to be expended by the Police Department for unmarked cruiser replacement.

    [This funds the purchase a Ford Police Interceptor unmarked vehicle that will be replacing a Toyota 4Runner with over 130,000 miles.  These cruisers are utilized by police detectives and administration.]
  3. Police Public Safety Radio Maintenance - $12,000 to be expended by the Police Department for a maintenance agreement to cover public safety and public works radio system infrastructure.

    [This funds the contract for maintenance of all public safety radios and outlying infrastructure, equipment worth more than one million dollars.]
  4. Police Vehicle Maintenance -$6,500 to be expended by the Police Department for tire replacement and equipment maintenance of its fleet of vehicles.

    [This funds the purchase of some fifty pursuit-rated tires, for the Police Department fleet.].

II. FIRE DEPARTMENT

  1. Fire Major Equipment Repair -$15,000 to be expended by the Fire Department for major equipment repairs and upkeep.

[This funds preventative maintenance and repairs to keep the Fire Department fleet-- apparatus, ambulances, and service vehicles-- in good working order.]

  1. Protective Clothing Replacement - $12,000 to be expended by the Fire Department for establishment of an annual replacement program for turnout gear.

[The funding of this article will allow for a replacement program for firefighters protective apparel. The current gear is reaching the end of its service life and must be replaced.]

  1. Engine 2 Combination Rescue/Pumper - $550,000 to be expended by the Fire Department for the replacement of the 1998 Engine 2 and 2002 GMC Rescue truck with a combination rescue/pumper vehicle.

[This funds the replacement of two vehicles—Engine 2 and rescue truck—with a new combination rescue/pumper. The current Engine 2-- purchased in 1998 as a demonstration unit with a 10-year life expectancy—has significant body corrosion and is in need of a full pump replacement, which is cost prohibitive. The new Engine 2 will be designed to accommodate essential equipment from the Rescue and Engine 2, enabling us to operate one, multifunction rescue pumper. This fleet reduction will allow the department to operate more efficiently with decreased maintenance costs.]

III. HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT

  1. Highway Major Equipment Repair - $15,000 to be expended by the Highway Department for major equipment repairs and upkeep.

[This funds such Highway Department expenses such as large truck/equipment transmission repairs or replacement, major engine repairs on trucks, loaders, backhoes, skid steer loaders, commercial field maintenance equipment, dump/sander trucks and dump/sander spring suspension repairs/replacement.]

  1. Highway Mack Truck repairs - $25,000 to be expended by the Highway Department to make repairs to the frame rails on a 1999 Mack 10 Wheel Truck.

[This funds the replacement of the truck frame rails on a model year 2000 Mack RD690S 10 wheel hook lift truck. In November 2014 a crack was discovered on the driver’s side frame rail of the vehicle. The frame rail was temporarily repaired until the new frame rail replacement could be funded and scheduled for permanent repairs.]

  1. Highway Backhoe – $150,000 to be expended by the Highway Department for replacement of a 1992 John Deere backhoe.

[This funds the replacement of the Highway Department’s 1992 John Deere 710C backhoe with a new 2015/2016 model year backhoe.]

IV. SCHOOLS

  1. MacBook Air Laptops - $35,000 to be expended by the School Committee for the second year payment on the lease/purchase agreement for MacBook Air laptops and accessory hardware and equipment.

[This funds the second of three annual payments for the lease/purchase agreement for MacBook Air Laptops for teachers.]

  1. LHS Classroom Life Skills Retrofit - $45,000 to be expended by the School Committee for Classroom Life Skills retrofit at Littleton High School.

[This funds the retrofit of an existing room at the High School into a Life Skills Teaching space for Littleton special education programs, including architectural design, construction, and equipment. The project includes installation of a washer/dryer, stove, storage and counter space for life skills educational programs.]

  1. School Freezers – $6,000 be expended by the School Committee to replace school freezers evaporator motors and controllers.

[This funds replacement of refrigeration motors at four schools, with walk-in coolers  with energy-efficient EC (electronically commutated) motors that run 80% more efficient that current freezers. Return on this investment is less than 2.5 years.]

  1. Chrome Book Computer Systems and Equipment - $45,000 be expended by the School Committee for Chrome Book computer systems and equipment.

[This funds additional student computers, Chromebooks, carts, and related equipment for educational programs and to be distributed to all four schools buildings.]

  1. Misc. Technology Equipment replacement - $25,000 to be expended by the School Committee for replacements of cameras, projectors, and televisions as needed.

[This funds replacement of broken technology equipment; purchase of additional televisions for classroom use, document cameras, and other technology in all schools.]

  1. School Textbooks, Resource Materials, Training - $70,000 to be expended by the School Committee for acquisition of school textbooks and other resource materials, and for engaging services for teacher training.

[This funds textbooks and resource materials for the schools, and for engaging services for teacher training.]

V. FACILITIES AND INFRASTRUCTURE

  1. Facility Needs Assessment Study Recommendations – $427,280 to be expended by the Permanent Municipal Building Committee to implement recommendations of the Facility Needs Assessment Study, as follows:
    1. High School Building, $122,500
    2. High School Site, $30,542
    3. Police Headquarters, $18,847
    4. Russell Street School Site, $6,835
    5. School paving projects, $142,263
    6. Town Office & Library, $106,293

[The Permanent Municipal Building Committee has brought forward a list of recommended facility projects to address life safety, code compliance, building envelope, building systems, IT/security building infrastructure, interior finishes, and building site/grounds issues. This year’s list totals $427,280. It addresses wall paining and dual water heater replacements at the High School Building; crack pavement at the High School Site; crack seal and seal coat pavement at Police Headquarters; replacing a four-foot-high chain link fence at Russell Street School Site; various paving projects at the Middle, Russell Street and Shaker Lane Schools; and replacing condensers and roof top HVAC units at the Town Office & Library.]

  1. Fire Station Modular Building - $6,000 to be expended by the Fire Department and the Permanent Municipal Building Committee to locate a modular building on site for sleeping quarters. 

[This enables the Fire Department to properly house staff that is on shift around the clock. The fire existing facility does not have living quarters, so a modular building is required for 24-hour staffing.]

  1. Cemetery HVAC System - $25,000 to be expended by the Cemetery Commissioners and Permanent Municipal Building Committee to make needed HVAC repairs at the Cemetery building facility.

[This funds the replacement of the Cemetery building’s 20-year old heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system, which is failing.]

VI. OTHER

  1. Cemetery Mower - $4,900 to be expended by the Cemetery Commissioners for a replacement navigator mower.

[This is the net cost to the Town, with trade-in of a 2013 Walker mower, for a 2015 X Mark Navigator mower, which is a more versatile machine for daily mowing of the Westlawn Cemetery.]

  1. Park/Recreation Major Equipment & Repairs - $50,000 to be expended by the Park & Recreation Commissioners for major equipment/facility repair and maintenance.

[This funds major equipment and facility repairs and maintenance for the Park, Recreation, and Community Education Department.]

  1. Master Plan Update - $100,000 to be expended by the Planning Board to update the Town’s Master Plan.

[The Planning Board is requesting another $100,000, to add to the $113,612 appropriated by town meetings in 2014, for updating the Town’s Master Plan, which was last updated in 2002. A Master Plan Update Steering Committee is working with the Planning Board to develop a scope of services for this project, which is expected to take a year or more to complete, once begun.]

Motion: Moved and seconded by the Board of Selectmen that the Town vote to raise and appropriate $852,531 and transfer from the Undesignated Fund Balance the sum of $918,280 for a total of $1,770,811 for capital projects and purchases itemized and described in Article 7 as printed in the warrant.

Finance Committee, Board of Selectmen, and School Committee support Article 7.

ARTICLE 8 - Community Preservation Committee - FY 2016 Community Preservation Budget

To see if the Town will vote to hear and act on the report of the Community Preservation Committee on the Fiscal Year 2016 Community Preservation Budget, to appropriate or reserve from FY 2016 Community Preservation Fund annual revenues and reserves the following amounts, as recommended by the Community Preservation Committee, with each item considered a separate appropriation; or to take any other action in relation thereto:

  

From

    

Appropriations

TOTAL

Open Space

Historic

Housing

Admin

Undesignated

Administration Expenses

 $5,000

   

$5,000

 

Debt Service for Open Space

104,282

22,242

   

82,040

Debt Service for Historic Resources

15,325

 

15,325

   

Houghton Building UV Radiation Window Protection

8,000

 

6,917

              -  

 

1,083

Housing Authority Heating Systems

18,000

 

 

18,000

 

 

Appropriations sub-total

150,607

22,242

22,242

18,000

5,000

83,123

Reserves

 

 

 

 

 

 

Community Housing

4,242

  

4,242

  

Undesignated

67,573

 

 

 

 

67,573

Reserves sub-total

71,815

  

4,242

 

67,573

Summary

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriations

150,607

22,242

22,242

18,000

5,000

83,123

Reserves

71,815

                

 

4,242

 

67,573

TOTAL

$222,422

 $22,242

 $22,242

$22,242

$5,000

 $150,695

[Article 8 contains the recommendations of the Community Preservation Committee to apportion Community Preservation Act funds for open space, historic preservation, and community housing, including debt service for previously approved projects. The CPC also recommends the following new projects: $8,000 requested by the Littleton Historical Society for ultraviolet radiation window protection for the Houghton Memorial Building; and $18,000 requested by the Housing Authority for new heating systems for two units at Pine Tree Park.]

Motion: Moved and seconded by the Community Preservation Committee that the Town vote to approve the appropriations and reserves itemized and described in Article 8 as printed in the warrant.

Community Preservation Committee, Finance Committee, and Board of Selectmen support Article 8.

ARTICLE 9 - Board of Selectmen - Fund Collective Bargaining Agreements

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds a sum or sums of money for the purpose of funding any new collective bargaining agreements between the Town and its employee unions, or to take any other action in relation thereto.

[Article 9 funds the first year of collective bargaining agreements reached with the Town’s unions for successor agreements to ones that will expire on June 30, 2015. Negotiations with the police, fire, dispatch, and highway unions are currently underway.]

Motion: To be made at Town Meeting.

ARTICLE 10 - Board of Selectmen/Personnel Board - Personnel By-law Amendments

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel By-law and Classification and Compensation Plan, Chapter 33 of the Town Code, as recommended by the Personnel Board, and further to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds a sum or sums of money to fund salary adjustments for non-union employees, or to take any other action in relation thereto.

[Article 10 amends the Personnel By-law relative to maternity and paternity leave, sick leave and short- and long-term disability leave, workers compensation, and awarding of step raises for employees who change jobs. This article also amends the compensation plan for non-union employees by applying a 2% adjustment to Schedule A, which has not been updated since FY 2013, and funds salary adjustments for non-union employees.]

Motion: Moved and seconded by the Board of Selectmen that the Town vote to amend the Personnel By-law and Classification and Compensation Plan, Chapter 33 of the Town Code, as recommended by the Personnel Board, as printed in the motion on pages 26-30 of the Town Meeting Report, and further to raise and appropriate the sum of $58,602 to fund salary adjustments for non-union employees.

Personnel Board, Board of Selectmen, and Finance Committee support Article 10.

  1. Amend §33-16. MOVEMENT AND RE-CLASSIFICATION OF EMPLOYEES  relative to step raise eligibility for an employee who has changed jobs, by adding a new paragraph after paragraph C, to read as follows:

D. Employees who change positions as outlined in items A through C above may receive annual step increases in accordance with §33-13, even though they have not completed a year of service in the new position, so long as they have completed a year of satisfactory service to the Town.

and to renumber the paragraph which follows as “E.”

  1. Amend §33-25. SICK LEAVE POLICY relative to application of the Family and Medical Leave Act, by amending Section 1, paragraph C to read as follows:

C. Extended Absences - The Town may require employees absent from work due to illness or injury for 3 or more consecutive working days, to provide medical documentation concerning the nature, severity, and duration of the illness or injury. All work related injuries that exceed three days will also be covered by the Family and Medical Leave Act. The Town may require an employee who seeks to return to work after being absent, whether paid or unpaid, for five (5) consecutive work days or more, to be examined by a Town selected physician to determine the employee's fitness for work. If the Town requires a medical certificate from a Town selected physician, the Town will pay the cost of the physician's services in examining the employee.

  1. Amend §33-25. SICK LEAVE POLICY relative to awarding of personal days for unused sick days for new employees, by amending Section 1, paragraph E to read as follows:

Sick leave may not be carried into the next fiscal year and no payment will be made for unused sick time upon termination of the employee for any reason.However at the end of the fiscal year, unused sick leave may be used to establish or replenish a Short Term Disability leave bank.For the period from January 1, 2013 through June 30, 2013, any employee who uses two (2) or fewer sick leave days during this period shall be awarded, in exchange for one of the unused sick leave days, one additional Personal Day for use in the fiscal year beginning on July 1, 2013.  In successive years, employees using four (4) or fewer sick leave days in the preceding fiscal year shall be awarded, in return for two (2) of the unused sick leave days, two (2) additional personal days as of July 1 of the new fiscal year, for use in that year.Employees using four (4) or fewer sick leave days in the preceding fiscal year shall be awarded, in return for two (2) of the unused sick leave days, two (2) additional personal days as of July 1 of the new fiscal year, for use in that year.  New employees hired within the first six months of the fiscal year (ending December 31st) and using four (4) or fewer sick leave days during that fiscal year, shall be awarded, in return for two (2) of the unused sick leave days, three (3) STD bank days to be added to the employee’s STD bank as of July 1 of the new fiscal year.  New employees hired after December 31st of the fiscal year will not be eligible for STD bank bonus days until the following fiscal year.

  1. Amend §33-25. SICK LEAVE POLICY  relative to pro-rating of sick days for an employee on short term disability, so that the first paragraph of Section 2  reads as follows:

SHORT TERM DISABILITY - Short Term Disability benefits are available to eligible employees once they have completed six months of service or the end of their probationary period, whichever is greater one year of employment.  This section does not apply to those on approved Worker’s Compensation leave.

And further, so that paragraphs C, D, E, and F read as follows:

C. While on disability, an employee will be required to report to the Department Head or Human Resources at least once per week to provide a status update as to their condition and approximate date of return to work.During a period of disability, the employee will not be awarded sick or personal time or continue to accrue vacation time but will continue to participate in other voluntary benefits such as health, life and dental insurances and flexible spending plans on the same basis as active employees as long as they continue to meet the provider’s eligibility requirements . When returning from short term disability that has crossed fiscal years, an employee will immediately earn sick and personal time on a pro-rated basis similar to new employees as described in §33-25, 1. A. The difference between the pro-rated sick time award and the normal amount that would have been awarded on July 1st will be added to the employee’s short term disability leave bank.

D. Employees shall not hold any type of employment during short term disability.Disability benefits may be offset by payments from retirement, social security, worker’s compensation, or other disability coverage (federal, state or county).

  1. The STD bank may be established and replenished with unused sick time as stated in the sick leave policy, however at no time will the STD bank be allowed to exceed 40 days. No payment will be made for unused STD bank time upon termination of the employee for any reason.

F. The STD bank may be used during the 30 day waiting period to augment wages only when all current fiscal year accrued sick days, personal days and vacation days have been exhausted.The use of these STD days is only allowed in the event of a qualified STD leave

  1. Amend §33-25. SICK LEAVE POLICY , Section 3, to read as follows:

LONG TERM DISABILITY - Benefit eligible employees are eligible for long term disability benefits after completing one year of employment.This section does not apply to those on approved Worker’s Compensation leave.

A. Coverage Period - Employees who experience a personal illness or injury that causes a continuous and uninterrupted absence beyond 180 days will be considered for long term disability. This benefit can provide up to 60% of weekly base wage, not to exceed $5,000 per month. While on disability, an employee will be required to report to their supervisor at least once per week to provide a status update as to their condition and approximate date of return to work.During a period of disability, the employee will not continue to be awarded sick or personal time or continue to accrue vacation time but will continue to participate in other voluntary benefits such as health, life and dental insurances and flexible spending plans on the same basis as active employees as long as they continue to meet the provider’s eligibility requirements and employment has not been terminated.

B. When returning from long term disability that has crossed fiscal years, an employee will immediately earn sick and personal time on a pro-rated basis similar to new employees as described in §33-25, 1. A. The difference between the pro-rated sick time award and the normal amount that would have been awarded on July 1st will be added to the employee’s short term disability leave bank.

C. Wages will freeze at the current step while out on long term disability leave. Disability benefits may be offset by payments from retirement, social security, worker’s compensation, or other disability coverage (federal, state or county).

  1. Qualifications - An employee will qualify for long-term disability benefits upon meeting the eligibility requirements of the LTD provider who will be solely responsible for any disability determination or decision. In the event the Town does not have a long-term disability insurance policy in force, the Board of Selectmen will establish any benefit requirements.
  1. Add the following:

§33-26A Maternity Leave: Maternity Leave is available in accordance with the Family and Medical Leave Act and/or the Massachusetts Maternity Leave Act, as appropriate.When available, this leave is unpaid, unless the employee has accrued paid leave time available, to be used concurrently.

§33-26B Paternity Leave: See Maternity Leave above. The Town of Littleton will provide leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act and/or the Massachusetts Maternity Leave Act to all employees, regardless of gender, who otherwise meet the requirements for leave under one or both of these Acts.

  1. Amend §33-41. WORKER’S COMPENSATION for consistency with short and long term disability provisions, by amending §33-41 to read as follows:

WORK RELATED INJURIES – Employees injured while on duty will be covered by Worker’s Compensation Benefits.  All work related injuries that exceed three (3) days will also be covered by the Family Medical Leave Act.

A. Worker’s Compensation wages will be governed by MGL Chapter 152.  Employees may supplement any difference between Worker’s Compensation wages and the regular straight time rate of pay by first using any accumulated sick time followed by any other accrued leave.  During a period of Worker’s Compensation leave, the employee will not be awarded sick or personal time or continue to accrue vacation time but will continue to participate in other voluntary benefits such as health, life and dental insurances and flexible spending plans on the same basis as active employees as long as they continue to meet the provider’s eligibility requirements and employment has not been terminated.  

Employees incurring work related injuries may receive payments under the Town’s Worker’s Compensation Insurance policy.  Payments are made in accordance with State and Federal Workers Compensation laws and can be augmented to 100% of the employee’s normal weekly wage with the use of sick leave, vacation, and STD leave bank days.   

Prior to returning to work, after a work related injury, employees will be required to present a fitness-for-duty certificate addressing their ability to perform the essential functions of the position. When returning from worker’s compensation leave that has crossed fiscal years, an employee will immediately earn sick and personal time on a pro-rated basis similar to new employees as described in §33-25,1 A. The difference between the pro-rated sick time award and the normal amount that would have been awarded on July 1st will be added to the employee’s short term disability leave bank.

  1. Amend Classification and Compensation Plan, SCHEDULE A, Permanent Full and Part-time Employees, by deleting “FY 2013” and inserting in place thereof “FY 2016”, and by applying a two percent (2%) salary schedule adjustment so that said schedule reads as follows:

GRADE

STEP 1

STEP 2

STEP 3

STEP 4

STEP 5

STEP 6

STEP 7

STEP 8

Employees

1

hourly

$13.77

$14.25

$14.75

$15.27

$15.80

$16.35

$16.92

$17.51

 

annual

$28,751.76

$29,754.00

$30,798.00

$31,883.76

$32,990.40

$34,138.80

$35,328.96

$36,560.88

2

hourly

14.74

15.26

15.79

16.34

16.91

17.50

18.12

18.75

 

annual

30,777.12

31,862.88

32,969.52

34,117.92

35,308.08

36,540.00

37,834.56

39,150.00

3

hourly

15.77

16.32

16.89

17.48

18.09

18.73

19.38

20.06

 

annual

32,927.76

34,076.16

35,266.32

36,498.24

37,771.92

39,108.24

40.465.44

41,885.28

4

hourly

16.87

17.46

18.07

18.71

19.36

20.03

20.74

21.46

 

annual

35,224.56

36,456.48

37,730.16

39,066.48

40,423.68

41,822.64

43,305.12

44,808.48

5

hourly

18.05

18.69

19.34

20.01

20.72

21.44

22.20

22.97

 

annual

37,688.40

39,024.72

40,381.92

41,780.88

43,263.36

44,766.72

46,353.60

47,961.36

6

hourly

19.32

19.99

20.70

21.42

22.17

22.95

23.76

24.59

 

annual

40,340.16

41,739.12

43,221.60

44,724.96

46,290.96

47,919.60

49,610.88

51,343.92

7

hourly

20.68

21.40

22.14

22.92

23.73

24.55

25.41

26.30

 

annual

43,179.84

44,683.20

46,228.32

47,856.96

49,548.24

51,260.40

53,056.08

54,914.40

8

hourly

22.12

22.90

23.70

24.53

25.39

26.28

27.19

28.14

 

annual

46,186.56

47,815.20

49,485.60

51,218.64

53,014.32

54,872.64

56,772.72

58,756.32

9

hourly

23.79

24.62

25.48

26.37

27.29

28.24

29.23

30.25

 

annual

49,673.52

51,406.56

53,202.24

55,060.56

56,981.52

58,965.12

61,032.24

63,162.00

10

hourly

26.16

27.08

28.03

29.01

30.03

31.08

32.17

33.29

 

annual

54,622.08

56,543.04

58,526.64

60,572.88

62,702.64

64,895.04

67,170.96

69,509.52

11

hourly

29.30

30.33

31.40

32.50

33.64

34.81

36.03

37.29

 

annual

61,178.40

63,329.04

65,563.20

67,860.00

70,240.32

72,683.28

75,230.64

77,861.52

Senior Management

12

hourly

34.58

35.79

37.05

38.34

39.69

41.08

42.51

44.00

 

annual

72,203.04

74,729.52

77,360.40

80,053.92

82,872.72

85,775.04

88,760.88

91,872.00

13

hourly

40.80

42.23

43.71

45.24

46.82

48.46

50.15

51.91

 

annual

85,190.40

88,176.24

91,266.48

94,461.12

97,760.16

101,184.48

104,713.20

108,388.08

14

hourly

45.70

47.30

48.95

50.66

52.44

54.27

56.17

58.14

 

annual

95,421.60

98,762.40

102,207.60

105,778.08

109,494.72

113,315.76

117,282.96

121,396.32

15

hourly

51.18

52.98

54.84

56.75

58.74

60.80

62.93

65.14

 

annual

106,863.84

110,622.24

114,505.92

118,494.00

122,649.12

126,950.40

131,397.84

136,012.32

 

 

 

 

 

GRADE 1

No positions assigned

GRADE 2

Cemetery Laborer

GRADE 3

Library Assistant

GRADE 4

Building Maintenance Custodian

Department Clerk

Driver’s Education Instructor I

Financial Technician

GRADE 5

Assessing Clerk

Cemetery Groundskeeper

Driver’s Education Instructor II

Library Technician

P/T Communications Officer

LCTV – P/T Program Coordinator

GRADE 6

Administrative Assistant – Building

Administrative Assistant – Conservation

Administrative Assistant – Fire

Administrative Assistant – Highway

Administrative Assistant– Human Resources

Administrative Clerk – Collector / Clerk

Senior Library Technician

Special Programs Instructor

Program Specialist I

GRADE 7

Business Administrator – Highway

Executive Assistant to the Police Chief

Payroll and Finance Coordinator

Reserve Police Officer

Library Office Coordinator

Wellness Coordinator

GRADE 8

Assistant Town Clerk

Program Specialist II

GRADE 9

Assistant Assessor

Assistant Director-PRCE

Assistant Town Accountant

Building Maintenance Supervisor

Cemetery Superintendent

Children’s Services/Senior Librarian

Conservation Coordinator

Driver’s Education Program Coordinator

Elder and Human Services Outreach Coordinator and Respite Care

Executive Assistant to the Town Administrator

Head of Circulation & Interlibrary Loan/Senior Librarian

LCTV Production Supervisor

Senior Librarian

Technical Services/Senior Librarian

Young Adult Services/Reference Services/ Senior Librarian

Zoning Assistant / Permit Technician / Business Administrator

GRADE 10

Assistant Library Director

Inspector of Wires

Plumbing & Gas Inspector

GRADE 11

Assistant Treasurer and HR Administration

Director of Elder and Human Services

Littleton Community Television Executive Director

Parks, Recreation & Community Education Director

Planning Administrator/Permit Coordinator

Police Lieutenant*

Tax Collector

Town Clerk**

GRADE 12

Building Commissioner/Zoning Enforcement Officer

Chief Assessor/Appraiser

Highway Operations Manager and Superintendent

Information Systems Manager

Town Treasurer

Deputy Fire Chief*

Deputy Police Chief*

Library Director*

GRADE 13

Assistant Town Administrator for Finance & Budget*

Fire Chief*

GRADE 14

Chief of Police*

GRADE 15

Town Administrator*

Management contract (*) and elected (**) positions not subject to this By-law

  1. Add to the listing of positions under Schedule B: “Election Warden” at $16.56 per hour.
  2. Amend  SCHEDULE C, as requested by the Park & Recreation Commission, to read as follows:

Seasonal / Temporary / Fee-Based Positions [Hourly]

  •  

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

Step 4

Step 5

  1.  

$9.00

$9.25

        $9.50

       $9.76

$10.03

  1.  

9.25

9.50

         9.76

      10.03

10.31

  1.  

9.50

9.76

      10.03

     10.31

10.59

  1.  

9.76

10.03

       10.31

      10.59

10.88

  1.  

10.22

10.50

       10.79

      11.09

11.39

  1.  

10.71

11.00

      11.30

      11.61

11.93

  1.  

11.22

11.53

       11.85

      12.18

12.51

  1.  

11.75

12.07

       12.40

      12.74

13.09

  1.  

12.31

12.65

       13.00

      13.36

13.73

  1.  

12.89

13.24

       13.60

      13.97

14.35

  1.  

13.50

13.87

       14.25

      14.64

15.04

  1.  

14.14

14.53

       14.93

      15.34

15.76

GRADE 1

Program Aide I

Camp Junior Counselor

Snack Hut Attendee

GRADE 2

Program Aide II

Lifeguard I

Junior Sailing Instructor

Maintenance Technician

GRADE 3

Camp Senior Counselor

GRADE 4

Junior Guard Coordinator

Snack Hut Manager

GRADE 5

Aftercare Coordinator

Camp Lead II

Lifeguard II/WSI

Sailing Instructor

GRADE 6

Camp Lead II

Program Coordinator

GRADE 7

Camp Specialists

 GRADE 8

Head Lifeguard

Camp Assistant Director

Sailing Coordinator

GRADE 9

Seasonal Programs Instructor

GRADE 10

Special Course Coordinator

GRADE 11

Preschool Instructor

GRADE 12

Camp Director

  1. Amend SCHEDULE C-1, as requested by the Park & Recreation Commission, to read as follows:

Community Education / Temporary / Fee-Based [Hourly]

 

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

  1.  

$ 9.00

$ 9.23

$9.46

  1.  

14.00

14.35

14.71

  1.  

20.00

20.50

21.01

  1.  

25.00

25.63

26.27

  1.  

30.00

30.75

31.52

  1.  

35.00

35.88

36.77

GRADE 1  Community Education Teacher’s Aide

GRADE 2  Community Education Assistant

GRADE 3  Community Education Instructor 1

GRADE 4  Community Education Instructor 2

GRADE 5  Community Education Instructor 3      

GRADE 6  Community Education Instructor 4

ARTICLE 11 - Board of Selectmen - Stabilization Fund [2/3rds vote required]

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of $39,696 for the Stabilization Fund in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 40, Section 5B of the General Laws, or to take any other action in relation thereto.

[The Town’s adopted financial management policy requires that 5% of the operating budget be maintained in the Stabilization Fund. To do so, $39,696 needs to be added to that fund, to bring its total to $1,875,253. The Town’s AAA bond rating is based in part on maintaining a healthy balance in this and other reserve accounts, as well as for adhering to its financial policies.]

Motion: Moved and seconded by the Board of Selectmen that the Town vote to transfer from the Undesignated Fund Balance the sum of $39,696 for Article 11 as printed in the warrant.

Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen support Article 11.

ARTICLE 12 - Board of Selectmen - Capital Stabilization Fund [2/3rds vote required]

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $180,000 for the purpose of supplementing the Capital Stabilization Fund established by Article 6 of the May 6, 2013 Special Town Meeting, as authorized by Chapter 40, Section 5B of the General Laws, or to take any other action in relation thereto.

[The Town’s adopted financial management policy requires that an amount equal to at least 1% of the total General Fund capital plan (this year, $17,708) be appropriated annually into the Capital Stabilization fund. This article adds $180,000, which would increase the fund balance from $211,668 to $391,668. Withdrawals can be made for capital purchases which comply with the capital / facility maintenance section of the financial policy.]

Motion: Moved and seconded by the Board of Selectmen that the Town vote to approve Article 12 as printed in the warrant.

Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen support Article 12.

ARTICLE 13 - Board of Selectmen/School Committee/Trust Fund Commissioners - School Trust Fund Grants

To see if the Town will vote to transfer $31,900 from the following Trust Funds:

M.H. Kimball Fund

$24,500

J. Goldsmith Fund            

400

C. Hildreth Fund                

5,000

L. Johnson Fund                

800

L.H. Zappy Fund                 

1,200

Total

$31,900

 

 

to the Littleton School Department for the following purposes and costs related thereto:

Implement K-5 English Language Arts Program

$21,900

Purchase 6-9 Science Curricula

5,000

Purchase Advanced Algebra Textbooks

5,000

Total

$31,900

 

 

or to take any other action in relation thereto.

[Article 13 is for the annual transfer of funds from the Town’s trust funds, managed by the Trust Fund Commissioners, to the School Department.  This year’s transfer comes from five individual trusts, all designated to benefit the Littleton Public Schools, and will help fund the cost of implementing enhanced curricular offerings throughout the K to 12 system. Programs to include K-5 ELA program, Grades 6-8 Science materials, curriculum supplies and services, and Grades 11-12 mathematics textbooks, related equipment, supplies and services.]

Motion: Moved and seconded by the Board of Selectmen that the Town vote to approve Article 13 as printed in the warrant.

Finance Committee, Trust Fund Commissioners, School Committee, and Board of Selectmen support Article 13.

ARTICLE 14 - Board of Selectmen - Senior Citizens and Veterans Tax Work-off Abatement Programs

To see if the Town will vote to request the Board of Assessors to commit the following sums from the Overlay Account for Abatements to fund Property Tax Work-off Abatement Programs for Senior Citizens ($55,000) and Veterans ($7,000), or to take any other action in relation thereto.

[The Town has established programs under which local property owners over the age of 60, and qualifying veterans, provide services to the Town in exchange for a reduction on the amount paid on their property tax. This year, the senior citizens program has 101 participants; the veterans program, 18.]

Motion: Moved and seconded by the Board of Selectmen that the Town vote to approve Article 14 as printed in the warrant.

Finance Committee, Board of Selectmen, and Council on Aging support Article 14.

ARTICLE 15 - Board of Selectmen - Use of MassDOT Chapter 90 Funds

To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds or authorize the Treasurer to borrow in anticipation of reimbursements, a sum of money for authorized road improvements and other projects provided for under Chapter 90 of the General Laws, or to take any other action in relation thereto.

[Article 15 is an annual appropriation of state funds to reimburse for qualifying Town road improvements, which Littleton uses to help pay for the ten-year roadway improvement program. In FY 2015, Littleton received $586,499 in Chapter 90 funds from a $300-million statewide bond issue; for FY 2016, $391,238 from $200-million statewide.]

Motion: Moved and seconded by the Board of Selectmen that the Town vote to appropriate funds available in the amount of $391,238 for authorized road improvements and other projects provided for under Chapter 90 of the General Laws.

Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen support Article 15.

ARTICLE 16 - Board of Selectmen - Rescind Unused Borrowing Authorizations [2/3rds vote required]

To see if the Town will vote to rescind the borrowing authorized for the following articles and following un-issued amounts, or to take any other action in relation thereto:

Town Meeting Vote

Project

Authorization

Amount Issued

Total to be Rescinded

11/5/2007 STM Art.16

Cobbs Well

$200,000

$178,800

$21,200

5/5/2008 STM Art.6

Russell Street School design

500,000

232,800

267,200

5/4/2009 STM Art.4

Russell St. School construction

13,400,000

5,428,845

7,971,155

5/4/2009 ATM Art.9

Subsurface Disposal-Foster St

250,000

-

250,000

11/9/2009 STM Art.6

Water Capital Improvements

300,000

274,200

25,800

5/2/2011 STM Art.4

Capital Improvements Well#2

125,000

118,300

6,700

5/7/2012 ATM Art.12

Track Funding Project

435,000

-

435,000

5/7/2012 STM Art.4

Well #2 Design

200,000

194,700

5,300

11/14/2012 STM Art.7

Well #2 Redevelopment

3,750,000

3,720,000

30,000

 

 

 

Total

$9,012,355

      

[Article 16 rescinds the unused portion of borrowings previously authorized by town meeting for projects which have since been completed. Amounts rescinded for the Russell Street School project reflect a combination of reimbursements received from the Massachusetts School Building Authority ($4,560,016), project costs savings ($3,378,174) from the original approved budgets, and cash payments ($300,165) made on the project and not borrowed. Other projects, including the track and the Foster Street septic system, were funded by bond anticipation notes, rather than by a permanent bond issue. Article 16 reduces the Town’s total authorized and unissued debt on the books to $4.4-million, including the $1-million proposed in Special Town Meeting Article 7. As of June 30, 2014, the Town had a total of $26.9-million in outstanding debt.]

Motion: Moved and seconded by the Board of Selectmen that the Town vote to approve Article 16 as printed in the warrant.

Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen support Article 16.

[Articles Requiring Supermajority Vote]

ARTICLE 17 - Planning Board - Zoning By-law Amendment: Nonconforming Structures [2/3rds vote required] 

To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 173-10.B of the Zoning By-law of the Town of Littleton as follows: 

1. Amend subsection (1) to read as follows:  

Alteration of nonconforming structures with respect to an existing nonconformity. The Board of Appeals may, by special permit, allow the reconstruction, extension or structural change of a preexisting nonconforming structure that extends or increases an existing nonconformity, where it determines that the proposed modification will not be substantially more detrimental than the existing nonconforming structure to the neighborhood.

2. Insert a new subsection (2) to read as follows: 

Alteration of nonconforming structures with respect to a new nonconformity. For any reconstruction, extension or structural change of a nonconforming structure that involves the creation of a new nonconformity, such new nonconformity shall require the issuance of a variance from the Board of Appeals.   

3. Insert a new subsection (3) to read as follows: 

Alteration of a nonconforming use. The Board of Appeals may, by special permit, allow the change, extension, or alteration of a preexisting nonconforming use where it determines that the proposed modification will not be substantially more detrimental than the existing nonconforming use to the neighborhood. Once changed to a conforming use, no structure or land shall be permitted to revert to a nonconforming use. 

4. Renumber existing subsections (2) Restoration and (3) Abandonment as subsections (4) and (5), respectively, to account for the new subsections as provided for above.

or take any other action in relation thereto.

[Article 17 as posted in the warrant memorializes the most recent treatment of nonconforming structures from the case law, in a way that should be clear and easy to work with. In the recent zoning case Deadrick v. Zoning Board of Appeals of Chatham, 85 Mass. App. Ct. 539 (2014), the Appeals Court made clear that a special permit authorizing the extension of a nonconforming structure (which is reviewed under the “not more detrimental to the neighborhood” standard) cannot be used to authorize a brand new nonconformity. Instead, any new nonconformity will require the issuance of a variance.

[At its public hearing on April 9, 2015, the Planning Board accepted further changes proposed by the Zoning Board of Appeals, as set forth in the recommended motion below.  In Items 1 and 2, “alteration” is added and “structural” deleted to more closely adhere to the statute.  In Item 3, the last sentence is deleted-- (“Once changed to a conforming use, no structure or land shall be permitted to revert to a nonconforming use.”)—which deletion would provide a two-year grace period for nonconforming uses to be reactivated.]

Motion: Moved and seconded by the Planning Board that the Town vote to amend Section 173-10.B of the Zoning By-law of the Town of Littleton as follows: 

1. Amend subsection (1) to read as follows:  

Alteration of nonconforming structures with respect to an existing nonconformity. The Board of Appeals may, by special permit, allow the reconstruction, extension, alteration or change of a preexisting nonconforming structure that extends or increases an existing nonconformity, where it determines that the proposed modification will not be substantially more detrimental than the existing nonconforming structure to the neighborhood.

2. Insert a new subsection (2) to read as follows: 

Alteration of nonconforming structures with respect to a new nonconformity. For any reconstruction, extension, alteration or change of a nonconforming structure that involves the creation of a new nonconformity, such new nonconformity shall require the issuance of a variance from the Board of Appeals.

3. Insert a new subsection (3) to read as follows: 

Alteration of a nonconforming use. The Board of Appeals may, by special permit, allow the change, extension, or alteration of a preexisting nonconforming use where it determines that the proposed modification will not be substantially more detrimental than the existing nonconforming use to the neighborhood.

4. Renumber existing subsections (2) Restoration and (3) Abandonment as subsections (4) and (5), respectively, to account for the new subsections as provided for above.

Planning Board, Zoning Board of Appeals, and Board of Selectmen support Article 17 as moved.

[Other Articles, including routine authorizations & reauthorizations]

ARTICLE 18 - Board of Selectmen / Sustainability Committee - Town By-law Amendment: Stretch Energy Code (Green Communities)

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town Code by adding Chapter 39, Stretch Energy Code for the purpose of regulating the design and construction of buildings for the effective use of energy, pursuant to Appendix 115.AA of the Massachusetts Building Code, 780 CMR, the Stretch Energy Code, including future editions, amendments or modifications thereto, a copy of which is on file with the Town Clerk, or take any other action relative thereto.

Chapter 39, Stretch Energy Code

§ 39-1 Definitions.

International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) - The International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) is a building energy code created by the International Code Council. It is a model code adopted by many state and municipal governments in the United States for the establishment of minimum design and construction requirements for energy efficiency, and is updated on a three-year cycle. The baseline energy conservation requirements of the MA State Building Code (the “Base Energy Code”) are the IECC with Massachusetts amendments, as approved by the Board of Building Regulations and Standards.

Stretch Energy Code - Codified by the Board of Building Regulations and Standards as 780 CMR Appendix 115.AA of the 8th edition Massachusetts building code, the Stretch Energy Code is an appendix to the Massachusetts building code, based on further amendments to the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) to improve the energy efficiency of buildings built to this code.

§39-2 Purpose. The purpose of 780 CMR 115.AA is to provide a more energy efficient alternative to the Base Energy Code applicable to the relevant sections of the building code for both new construction and existing buildings.

§39-3 Applicability.  The Stretch Energy Code applies to residential and commercial buildings. Buildings not included in this scope shall comply with 780 CMR 13, 34, 51, as applicable.

§39-4 Stretch Code. The Stretch Code, as codified by the Board of Building Regulations and Standards as 780 CMR Appendix 115.AA, including any future editions, amendments or modifications, is herein incorporated by reference into Chapter 39 of the Town Code. The Stretch Code is enforceable by the Building Commissioner.

[Article 18 adopts the so-called stretch energy code, which is a prerequisite for certification under the Green Communities Program. The State’s Department of Energy Resources conducted an informational forum in Littleton on the stretch energy code on Tuesday, April 7, 2015. The code has already been adopted by 147 communities, including Acton, Ayer, Bedford, Carlisle, Chelmsford, Concord, Harvard, Lexington, Lincoln, Maynard, Shirley, Sudbury, and Westford. Littleton would qualify for some $140,000 in Green Communities Act funding upon certification; and could apply for additional funds on a competitive basis.]

Motion: Moved and seconded by the Board of Selectmen that the Town vote to approve Article 18 as printed in the warrant.

Board of Selectmen and Sustainability Committee support Article 18.

ARTICLE 19 - Board of Selectmen - Complete Streets Program

To see if the Town will vote to accept Chapter 90I, Section 1 of the General Laws and authorize the Town of Littleton to participate in the Complete Streets certification program administered by Massachusetts Department of Transportation to encourage municipalities to regularly and routinely include complete streets design elements and infrastructure on locally-funded roads; and to apply for and receive funding from said program; or to take any other action in relation thereto.

[In December 2013, the Board of Selectmen and Planning Board adopted a Complete Streets Policy for LIttleton. In April 2014, a state statute became effective which requires local adoption by a vote of town meeting in order for a Town to be able participate in the state’s Complete Streets funding program.]

Motion: Moved and seconded by the Board of Selectmen that the Town vote to approve Article 20 as printed in the warrant.

Board of Selectmen and Planning Board support Article 19.

ARTICLE 20 - Board of Selectmen - Borrowing Authorization

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2015, in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 44, Section 4 of the General Laws, and to issue a note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one (1) year, in accordance with Chapter 44, Section 17 of the General Laws, or to take any other action in relation thereto.

[Article 20 allows the Town to borrow in anticipation of revenues and/or to issue short-term notes to meet its cash flow needs.]

Motion: Moved and seconded by the Board of Selectmen that the Town vote to approve Article 20 as printed in the warrant.

Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen support Article 20.

ARTICLE 21 - Board of Selectmen - Compensating Balance Agreement

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treasurer to enter into a Compensating Balance Agreement(s) for FY 2016, pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 53F of the General Laws, or to take any other action in relation thereto.

[This article authorizes the Treasurer to enter into agreements between the depositor (Town) and a bank in which the depositor agrees to maintain a specified level of non-interest bearing deposits in return for which the bank agrees to perform certain services for the depositor.]

Motion: Moved and seconded by the Board of Selectmen that the Town vote to approve Article 21 as printed in the warrant.

Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen support Article 21.

ARTICLE 22 - Board of Selectmen - FY 2016 Personal Exemption Amounts

To see if the Town will vote to accept Chapter 73 of the Acts and Resolves of 1986, as amended by Chapter 126 of the Acts and Resolves of 1988, and under the provisions thereof to grant additional real estate tax exemptions for fiscal year 2016 to those persons who otherwise qualify for an exemption under Clauses 17D, 22, 22A, 22B, 22C, 22D, 22E, 37A or 41C of section 5 of Chapter 59 of the General Laws (elderly persons, disabled veterans, or blind persons), in an amount equal to fifty percent (50%) of said exemption, or to take any other action in relation thereto.

[Article 22 permits the Town to grant an additional 50% in property tax exemptions to qualifying elderly, disabled veterans, and blind persons. The Town first so voted in 2001, and annual votes of town meeting are required to continue the practice.]

Motion: Moved and seconded by the Board of Selectmen that the Town vote to approve Article 22 as printed in the warrant.

Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen support Article 22.